FAQ

I am not Canadian, can I join the club?

posted Sep 21, 2008, 12:45 PM by Nicole Vickers   [ updated Sep 6, 2017, 9:34 AM ]

Of course you can join!  We are a collection of people from all kinds of backgrounds and a broad mix of personalities, so the more the merrier.  The common thread is of course "Canada", in what ever form it may be, just c'mon out and share your story or interest!

Why do we need to have a membership fee?

posted Sep 21, 2008, 12:45 PM by Nicole Vickers

Whereas we do have a modest fee for being a member in the CanClub, it is not a mandatory fee. It also helps us on the committee keep the Club up and running, including the website, and to be able to give the members a better Club to enjoy.
 
Plus, as a paid member, you are entitled to vote at the Annual General Meeting (AGM), which is held once a year, usually in November. Please see the Membership/Membre page for more info.

I can't speak swedish, but I want to work in Sweden

posted Sep 21, 2008, 12:44 PM by Nicole Vickers

Not knowing Swedish, and working in Sweden is not easy. In many high tech companies and in higher education, English is often the language of choice. Otherwise, it is my experience that this can be quite hard.
 
The Local has a nice English in Sweden job site that you can find here:
 
 
Good luck!

I am unfamiliar with the medical system here, how does it work?

posted Sep 21, 2008, 12:44 PM by Nicole Vickers

It works similarly to the Canadian system. First visit your "huslakäre", or go to the local "vårdcentralen", and from there a doctor will refer you if necessary to a specialist. The latest word is that you can phone directly to the Dr. you need through your local "vårdcentralen", which you can find in the telephone book.

Do any of you know or know of someone who knows where I can find reasonably priced accommodation?

posted Sep 21, 2008, 12:43 PM by Nicole Vickers

First of all, there is no reasonable priced accommodation in Stockholm! Well, very little, anyways. If you’re a student go through SSSB, or through your school and department. Student rooms and apartments are well situated and very reasonably priced.
 
Otherwise look on the Dagens Nyheter webpages, people post apartments they want to rent there. It is very common to rent ‘second-hand’ in Sweden. This means that the person who has the original rental contract will then re-rent out their apartment, for a slightly higher fee.
 
These apartments are usually available for a limited time period, but can be useful for 6 months to a year if you’re not going to be here very long. Otherwise, look on the internet for lots of resources on housing in the city, and services that specialize in finding apartments for people. As with most places, living farther away from the centre will reduce the cost of your apartment. Check out the the forum, or even, what the heck, come out to 'Club Night' and put the word out there!

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